PA Culture
#06-24

Claudia Peyghambari talks to us about Cultural Codes

“A Personal Angel must know the key points from each culture, given that it is impossible to know which situation we might find ourselves faced with”

 

Interview with Claudia Peyghambari, teacher of Cultural Codes in the Postgraduate Course at TLI

 

Cultural codes are reflected in the lifestyle of a community and getting to know the different meaning that individuals and cultures attribute to an object, relationship or food, amongst other infinite aspects, is fundamental to being successful as a Personal Angel. Claudia Peyghambari is the teacher of the Cultural Codes class, among other subjects in the Postgraduate Course at TLI. Her ample experience travelling and working for HNW families all around the world has given her a wide range of experience that she wants to impart to her students in such a way that not only will they gain a better understanding of diverse cultures but also will “fall in love with them a little bit”.

(Sigue en español)

 

Author:  María José Núñez 

 

-What exactly is meant by cultural codes?

Cultural codes as a concept are those which mark the lifestyle of a certain community or person as a form of expression. These codes are reflected in both where a person comes from, as well as in the psychology of each individual.

The French psychiatrist Clotaire Rapaille (2007) claims that cultural code is the inconsistent meaning that is given to any object, food, relationship, or even country, according to the culture in which someone has been brought up.

 

-Why is it so important in a PAs professional life to understand cultural codes?

As a PA, it is of utmost importance that our social abilities are perfectly developed. That’s why we need to know the key points from each culture, given that it is impossible to know which situation we might find ourselves faced with. Our ‘employer’ might be Russian, for example, but due to work is in contact with people from China, Saudi Arabia, Israel… each one very different to the others. It wouldn’t be unusual for them to request their PAs presence in some meetings, so it is our responsibility to know how to behave in that environment, both in the verbal and non-verbal sense. To sum up: It is crucial that we are comfortable in any social situation, because it is the only way that we can do our job to the best of our capabilities.

 

-What are the main areas that you cover in this Postgraduate subject at TLI?

Cultural codes are as infinite as they are interesting and, unfortunately, we have limited time to cover them all. We therefore go over the basics of the major world cultures. We cover Japanese, Arab, Mediterranean, Slavic and Chinese culture…. And we talk about things that could be as simple as how to greet someone – who would you offer a handshake to? Who would you greet simply by nodding your head? We need to know how to behave with each person: Who should you always avoid eye contact with? Who should you maintain it with? Is a smile accepted in all cultures? And so on… There are many more things that hopefully provide the tools needed to navigate all kinds of different situations.

 

“It is crucial that we are comfortable in any social situation, because it is the only way that we can do our job to the best of our capabilities”

 

-Have you come across any interesting situations whilst giving this class?

At TLI, we are lucky to have students who come from all kinds of working backgrounds.  Many of them have worked on an international level, which is an advantage both for the other students and the teachers as we can all learn something from them. This was the case for me in the latest edition when we were talking about Arab culture. Arab culture is not a culture that I have been exposed to my whole life, but something I have been lucky enough to work with when I was working as a hostess on yachts for more than one Arab family. When working with yachts, you are exhaustively prepared to reach the family’s high expectations and to take care of all the fine details: from our physical appearance to making sure there was no verbal communication when serving meals. I was just starting out my career as a hostess and in my first training, they repeatedly told me that when it came to serving the food, it was important to always serve the women first: “Ladies first, OK?”. Well, suddenly that was not the case here: with Arabic families it was important to serve the head of the family first, and, in their absence, whichever man of highest standing was present. I was also told to maintain a modest and helpful attitude both with the men and women in the family: Their expectation was eye contact but without holding the gaze, to be polite and friendly always and to only shake hands if the other person offered theirs first. It was regarding this last point that one student told me that her experience working with Arab families had been different: she had been told that she should never offer her hand to a woman. Another student said that their experience had been the same as mine and this opened up a really interesting debate about what we should and shouldn’t do when it comes to greeting an Arab woman. We finally came to the conclusion that both options were correct and that it was also important to take into account the social status: the family that I had worked with had a very high social status which allowed women to take the initiative when greeting someone, whereas the other family was upper middle class which could explain the physical distance that was expected when meeting someone new. I think this situation was highly educational for me as  I could compare my experience to that of other people, leading me to see something that hadn’t occurred to me until that moment: socio-economic status could impact something as simple as a greeting.

 

“We go over the basics of major world cultures. We cover Japanese, Arab, Mediterranean, Slavic and Chinese culture…. And we talk about things that could be as simple as how to greet someone”

 

-Cultural Codes are part of habits and customs, which are different in every country or culture. Does that make this subject something that is always changing and updating?

Taking into account the speed a which society is advancing, we also need to understand that customs are changing and therefore this is a subject that we always need to continue studying to make sure we are up-to-date.

 

-As a Postgraduate teacher at TLI, what do you try to put across to your students?

I hope students don’t just acquire clearer ideas about each culture, but that they also fall a little bit in love with them. As PAs, the students are going to have to keep themselves informed about cultural codes; it’s inevitable, but everything they learn will not only be applicable in their daily work but also if one day they go on holiday and decide to travel in Japan, for example, or China, or Morocco, or Russia! I would like to think that with what they have learnt, they would feel comfortable wherever they go.

 

“Taking into account the speed a which society is advancing, we also need to understand that customs are changing and therefore this is a subject that we always need to continue studying to make sure we are up-to-date”

 

-Finally, do you have an example of a specific situation in which it would be essential to understand cultural codes?

Let’s suppose that I am the PA to an important international businessman in the world of technology and they need to do a presentation at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona to promote a new product and I will be spending four days at the congress working on the company’s stand… I am going to be immersed in an international conference, surrounded by technology experts who come from all four corners of the earth and I am going to have to handle my boss’s schedule and it is very possible I will need to attend meetings with him to take notes of any important points that come up, or maybe I will just need to get the meeting room ready and ensure that the meetings happen on schedule.

As a PA, I am going to do my best and not only know how to communicate with the guests with absolute certainty – there is nothing like knowhow, right? – but also I am going to be able to take care of the finer details at every moment of the congress. For example, instead of checking that in the room there are drinks and snacks for everyone, I am also going to read through the list of attendees to each meeting and I am going to make sure that there are drinks and snacks that are suitable for each attendee: from Yorkshire tea to Persian Pistachios.

Furthermore, when my boss is busy and does not need my assistance, I will be at the stand and will need to be capable of responding to questions from different people that may be interested in the company. Not only will I need to know the product that we are promoting to perfection, but also be capable of describing it by adapting my verbal communication and body language to the culture that the person who I am talking to at any given moment comes from. It sounds simple, but it’s very easy to make mistakes that others could interpret as offensive if you don’t have the appropriate knowledge.

 

Copyright ©by Alberta La Grup
If you wish to re-print this article or photos, that’s fine. Just include the biography at the end of the article. Thank you!
Photo Credits: TLI
Translation: Emily Benton

 

Claudia Peyghambari talks to us about Cultural Codes

 

“Un Personal Angel debe conocer los puntos clave de cada cultura, puesto que nunca sabe en qué situación se puede encontrar”

 

Entrevista a Claudia Peyghambari, profesora de Códigos Culturales en el Postgrado de TLI

 

Los códigos culturales reflejan el estilo de vida de una comunidad. Y conocer los diferentes significados que los individuos y las culturas le otorgan a un objeto, relación o comida, entre otros ilimitados aspectos, es fundamental en el buen desempeño de la profesión de Personal Angel. Claudia Peyghambari es quien imparte la asignatura de Cultural Codes, entre otras materias del Postgrado de TLI. Su amplia experiencia viajando y trabajando para familias de alto poder adquisitivo en varios lugares del mundo, le han conferido una amplia experiencia que intenta trasladar a sus alumnos en sus clases, de manera que no solo adquieran unas ideas más claras acerca de las diversas culturas sino que también “se enamoren un poco de ellas”.  

 

Author:  María José Núñez 

 

-¿A qué nos referimos exactamente cuando hablamos de códigos culturales?

Los códigos culturales, como concepto, son todos aquellos que marcan el estilo de vida de una comunidad o una persona como una forma de expresión. Estos códigos se ven reflejados tanto en la procedencia como en la psicología de cada individuo.

El psiquiatra francés Clotaire Rapaille (2007) sostiene que el código cultural es la significación inconsciente que se le da a cualquier objeto, comida, relación, incluso un país, según la cultura en la que un individuo ha sido educado.

 

-¿Por qué es tan importante en la vida profesional de un PA conocer los códigos culturales?

Como PA es de suma importancia que nuestras habilidades sociales estén perfectamente desarrolladas. Para ello, deberemos conocer los puntos clave de cada cultura, puesto que nunca sabremos en qué situación nos podremos llegar a encontrar. Puede ser que nuestro ‘employer’ sea ruso, por ejemplo, pero que por su trabajo lidie con gente de China, Arabia Saudí, Israel… Cada cual más distinto que el anterior, y no sería raro que se nos pidiese que estuviésemos presentes en alguno de sus ´meetings´, con lo cual, es nuestra responsabilidad saber formar parte de ese entorno, cubriendo tanto la comunicación verbal como la no verbal. En definitiva: es crucial que nos encontremos cómodos en cualquier situación social, pues solo así podremos hacer nuestro trabajo al máximo nivel de nuestras capacidades.

 

-¿Cuáles son los principales puntos que tratas en esta asignatura del Postgrado de TLI? 

Los códigos culturales son tan amplios como interesantes y, por desgracia, tenemos un tiempo limitado para cubrirlos, por lo que optamos por enseñar lo que consideramos la base de las mayores culturas del mundo. Cubrimos la cultura japonesa, árabe, mediterránea, eslava, china… y hablamos de cosas tan simples pero importantes como saber saludar: ¿a quién saludaría ofreciéndole la mano? ¿a quién saludaría con una simple inclinación de cabeza?; saber a quién dirigirnos y cómo: ¿con quién es imprescindible que evite mantener contacto visual? ¿con quién debo asegurarme de mantenerlo? ¿la sonrisa es aceptada en todas las culturas? Y así, otras muchas cosas que, espero, les darán las herramientas para poder navegar situaciones de todo tipo.

 

“Es crucial que nos encontremos cómodos en cualquier situación social, pues solo así podremos hacer nuestro trabajo al máximo nivel de nuestras capacidades”

 

-Alguna situación curiosa con la que te hayas encontrado impartiendo la asignatura.

En TLI tenemos la suerte de contar con alumnos que llegan con experiencias laborales de lo más variopintas. Muchos de ellos, a nivel internacional, cosa que encuentro una ventaja tanto para el resto de los alumnos como para el profesorado, ya que también nosotros podemos aprender de ellos. Y éste fue mi caso en la última edición cuando hablábamos de la cultura árabe. La cultura árabe no es solo una cultura a la que he estado expuesta toda mi vida, sino que además he tenido la suerte de poder trabajar en mi faceta como azafata de yates para más de una familia árabe. En este último ámbito, se nos preparaba exhaustivamente para estar a la altura de las expectativas de la familia y se cuidaba hasta el último detalle: desde nuestra apariencia física hasta la comunicación no verbal durante el servicio de comidas. Yo estaba empezando en mi carrera como azafata, y en mi primera formación, no se cansaron de repetirme que, a la hora de servir la comida, siempre debía servir primero a las mujeres de la mesa. “Las damas primero, ¿verdad?” Pues a esto le dieron rápidamente la vuelta diciéndome que, en este caso, no era así: eran una familia árabe y, por tanto, siempre debía servir primero al jefe de familia o, en su ausencia, al hombre de mayor rango que hubiese presente. También me dijeron que debía asumir una actitud servicial tanto con los hombres como con las mujeres de la familia: se esperaba que les mirase a los ojos pero sin mantener la mirada, que fuese cordial y amable en todo momento, y que solo me presentase dando la mano si la otra persona daba el primer paso, independientemente de su género.

Fue por este último punto que una alumna me dijo que su experiencia laboral con familias árabes era diferente: a ella se le dijo que jamás debía darle la mano a una mujer. A esto otro alumno contestó que su experiencia había sido idéntica a la mía, cosa que abrió un debate interesantísimo sobre qué se debe y qué no se debe hacer a la hora de saludar a una mujer árabe. Al final llegamos a la conclusión de que ambas opciones eran correctas si se tenía en cuenta el estatus social: la familia para la que había trabajado yo tenía un estatus muy elevado, permitiendo que las mujeres tomasen la iniciativa del saludo, mientras que la otra familia venía de la clase media-alta, explicando así la distancia física que se esperaba en los encuentros personales que pudiesen tener.

Considero que la situación fue tremendamente educativa para mí ya que pude comprobar, desde la experiencia de otra persona, algo que no me había planteado hasta ese momento: cómo el estatus socio-económico puede variar algo tan básico como un saludo.

 

“Enseñamos lo que consideramos la base de las mayores culturas del mundo. Cubrimos la cultura japonesa, árabe, mediterránea, eslava, china… y hablamos de cosas tan simples pero importantes como saber saludar”

 

-Los códigos culturales están formados por hábitos y costumbres, diferentes en cada país o cultura. ¿Es, por lo tanto, una materia en constante movimiento y actualización?

Teniendo en cuenta la velocidad a la que está avanzando la sociedad debemos asumir que las costumbres también están cambiando y, por ello, es una materia que no podemos permitirnos dejar de estudiar si queremos seguir al día.

 

-Como profesora en el Postgrado de TLI, ¿qué intentas transmitir a tus alumnos? 

Espero que los alumnos no solo se vayan adquiriendo unas ideas más claras de lo que es cada cultura, sino que también se enamoren un poco de ellas. Como PAs van a tener que seguir informándose acerca de los códigos culturales; es inevitable, pero todo lo que aprendan no solo será aplicable en su día a día en el trabajo, también podrán aplicarlo si algún día se van de vacaciones y deciden recorrer Japón, por ejemplo, o China, o Marruecos… ¡o Rusia! Quiero pensar que con las pautas que les damos, van a sentirse cómodos allá a donde vayan.

 

“Teniendo en cuenta la velocidad a la avanza la sociedad debemos asumir que las costumbres también cambian y, por ello, no podemos permitirnos dejar de estudiar los Códigos Culturales si queremos seguir al día”

 

-Por último, ejemplo de situaciones concretas donde sea fundamental ese conocimiento de los códigos culturales.

Supongamos que soy el PA de un gran empresario del mundo de la tecnología que tiene que hacer una presentación en el Mobile World Congress de Barcelona para promocionar su nuevo producto, y que voy a pasarme los cuatro días del congreso en el stand de la empresa… Voy a estar inmersa en un congreso internacional, rodeada de expertos de la tecnología que vienen de todos los puntos del planeta, y voy a tener que llevarle la agenda a mi jefe, que es muy posible que me pida que le acompañe en sus reuniones para que tome nota de los puntos más importantes que se comenten, o simplemente, tendré que asegurarme de que la sala de reuniones esté preparada en todo momento y que se cumplan con los horarios.

Como PA voy a dar lo mejor de mí y no solo voy a saber relacionarme con los invitados con total seguridad – no hay nada como el saber estar, ¿verdad? – sino que también voy a cuidar hasta el mínimo detalle, cada minuto del congreso. Por ejemplo, en lugar de solo comprobar que en la sala haya agua y snacks para todos, también voy a leerme la lista de los integrantes de cada reunión, voy a comprobar de dónde son y voy a asegurarme de que haya bebidas y snacks para los gustos de cada uno: desde Yorkshire Tea hasta pistachos persas.

Además, cuando mi jefe esté ocupado y no me necesite, tendré que quedarme en el recibidor del stand y ser capaz de responder a las preguntas de las distintas personas que puedan estar interesadas. No solo tendré que conocer a la perfección el producto que se está promocionando, sino que tendré que ser capaz de describirlo adaptando mi expresión verbal y corporal a la cultura de la persona a la que me esté dirigiendo en ese momento. Parece algo muy simple, pero se pueden cometer errores que pueden interpretarse como ofensivos con mucha facilidad si no se cuenta con los conocimientos apropiados.

 

Todos los derechos reservados ©by Alberta La Grup
Si quieres publicar este artículo o fotografía, está bien. Sólo debes incluir la biografía, autor y esta información sobre los derechos. Gracias.
Crédito de fotos: TLI
Traducción: Emily Benton
  • PA Culture

    PA Culture is an e-Magazine created by Alberta La Grup and The Lifestyle Institute in their desire to give a voice to the culture of Lifestyle Management and the profession of Personal Angel, as well as everything that happens around their field of work. Our aim is to raise awareness of the figure of the Personal Angel (PA) as a professional expert in lifestyle management, working for the elite and with a combination of multiple skills and abilities brought together in the same person.


  • EDITORIAL

    Through our articles, interviews, news and reflections, we will highlight the different points of view of the people who make up this universe: their training, experience, curiosities, employment opportunities, community and guidance, their roles and different perspectives. Join us and get ready to fly... always high!


  • VOICES

    In this space you will find interviews and reflections from our professional team: from the faculty members of The Lifestyle Institute's Postgraduate Course to our team of Personal Angels from Alberta la Grup and the rest of the workers that make up this complete puzzle in which everything fits together perfectly.


  • PA’s WORLD

    Luxury, lifestyle, curiosities... In this section you will find news about the world of lifestyle management and the companies that work around this world. Everything that surrounds the PA universe.


  • CREDITS

    PROPERTY OF ALBERTA LA GRUP LIFESTYLE BUSINESS SL.

    Founder: Lourdes Carbó

    Editorial Coordinator: Maria José Núnez Garrido

    Contributors:
    Emily Benton (Translation)
    Elena Castelló (Editing)
    Claudia Schmidt (Art & Design)


  • CONTACT